What Washington’s kids need to weather the challenges of the COVID-19 crisis and beyond

What Washington’s kids need to weather the challenges of the COVID-19 crisis and beyond

Bolster investments in children and families to protect Washington’s future While the youngest Washingtonians have so far been largely spared from some of the worst health impacts of the COVID-19 crisis, the toll of the pandemic on the well-being of children and their families should not be underestimated. Prolonged school and child care closures, lost jobs and incomes, and the

Building Great Kids: Ensuring children have strong, stable early learning opportunities

Building Great Kids: Ensuring children have strong, stable early learning opportunities

August 2020 Healthy development for young kids creates a better future for all. Today’s children are the voters, parents, nurses, educators, volunteers, and business owners of tomorrow. Within just a few short years, they will take their places in civic society. Washington’s collective well-being—the health of public structures, the vibrancy of communities, the vitality of the economy—is enhanced by everyone

Investing in assets to build economic security for kids of color

A girl with black pigtails stands in front of a cityscape

State of Washington’s Kids 2020 Children can thrive when their communities are strong. Just as the well-being of children is tightly linked with the well-being of their parents and families, the health of children’s broader racial, ethnic, cultural, and geographic communities also profoundly shapes their development.1 When communities are equipped with strong foundations (like quality affordable housing, good schools, and

2019 Equity Challenge

End disparities in school readiness by investing in early childhood We all benefit when more Washington children start kindergarten ready to learn. But children of color face significant barriers to success in school and in life. To help kids overcome these barriers, state lawmakers should invest in early childhood. Download a copy in English  or in Spanish (PDF). Get the message

Research Brief: The Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP)

KIDS COUNT in Washington examined how expanding ECEAP to serve 23,000 unserved Washington children could impact readiness for kindergarten. Our analysis concluded that: Kindergarten readiness in Washington overall could increase by 20 percent (to 56 percent from 47 percent); 7,900 more children could be ready for kindergarten on all six indicators for readiness (see sidebar on the left for more

Acknowledgements

State of Washington's Kids 2016

Authors Lori Pfingst, Research & Policy Director, Washington State Budget & Policy Center Elena Hernandez, Policy Analyst, Washington State Budget & Policy Center Jon Gould, Deputy Director, Children’s Alliance Adam Hyla Holdorf, Communications Director, Children’s Alliance Photography Tegra Stone Nuess Design Nathan Runyan About Us KIDS COUNT in Washington is a joint effort of the Children’s Alliance and the Washington

Goal: All children have the opportunity to succeed in school and life.

State of Washington's Kids 2016

Structural racism—the way that policies, practices, and programs combine and interact to sustain poorer outcomes among communities of color—undermines progress for children. A high quality education system—one that empowers children to excel in school from preschool through higher education—supports students in reaching their full potential, and is essential for the future competitiveness and economic vitality of Washington state. Jump down

Goal: All young children have their basic needs met.

State of Washington's Kids 2016

Getting results means investing in kids of color, so they can overcome the barriers created by racism and poverty. Having basic needs met—like adequate food, safe and stable housing, and health care—is fundamental to all areas of well-being. No child should go without the basics. In Washington state, tremendous progress has been made in ensuring all children have health care coverage,